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CPIM Resource Development: Works Cited
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Documenting Your Research and References

To adequately support and develop your thesis, your white paper or PowerPoint should include well-documented research and references to other sources. Your white paper/PowerPoint must include a Works-Cited section that lists the sources you used, as well as parenthetical documentation.

CPIM Works-Cited Format

A Works-Cited page lists those works you have cited within the body of your paper and the sources you have used in the development of your project. The reader may refer to this list for the information required to access your sources for further independent research. It is likely that your sources will include books, periodicals, research reports, white papers, and web sites.

The Work Cited page should be placed at the end of your white paper or at the end of your presentation handout. White paper or presentation handout should be numbered consecutively within the body of the document.

The CPIM format requires that the entries be arranged alphabetically by the title of the article, book, report, and web site text being cited. If the title begins with an article (a, an, the) alphabetize by the next word. Avoid underlining titles; it is likely your finished document will be viewed online and underlining suggests a link to an online source.

Note the following examples:

  • Book

    Book Title (in italics), author’s last, author’s first name: publisher, city, state, province, territory, country, date.

    Incentives in Marketing & Motivation, Fried, PhD., Robert P., and Meredith, George: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, Iowa, USA, 1999.

  • Article in a Periodical

    Article Title (in quotation marks), author’s last name, author’s first name: periodical title (In italics), publication date, page numbers of article.

    "New Ways to Get Certified”, Grimaldi, Lisa: Meetings & Conventions Magazine, December, 2003, page 32.

  • Research Report/White Paper

    Title of Research Report (in quotation marks), name of organization and/or author that produced the report, location of organization, date of report publication.

    "A Study Conduct Among Current Users of Merchandise and Travel Items for Motivation/Incentive Applications”, Incentive Federation, Naples, Florida, June, 2003.

  • Information from a Web Site

    Title of article, research report, white paper (in italics), author’s last name, author’s first name, if applicable, web site section in quotation marks, date information retrieved, name of web site’s organization, web site address.

    Why Use Incentive Programs? "Incentive Program Info,” December 10, 2003, Incentive Marketing Association, www.incentivemarketing.org

Guidelines for additional documentation

You should also document the ideas, facts, and opinions you have included within your text. These references will also be included in your Works-Cited.

Try to use parenthetical documentation as little as possible. For example, when you cite an entire work, it is preferable to include the author's name in the text.

The following examples illustrate the most common kinds of documentation.

  • Documenting a quotation

    According to George Meredith in his book, Incentives in Marketing & Motivation, "Getting the best performance out of a sales force is a complex of many factors . . .” List author’s name and title of book or article (in italics).

    It is generally agreed, "getting the best performance out of a sales force is a complex of many factors” (Incentives in Marketing & Motivation, page 25). List title of book or article or study (in italics) and page number where quote is found. Parenthetical documentation is after the quotation mark and before the period.

  • Documenting a paraphrase

    The largest numbers of non-sales incentive programs are targeted to operations employees (A Study Conducted Among Current Users of Merchandise and Travel Items . . ., page 36). List title of book or article or study (in italics) and page number where quote is found. Parenthetical documentation is after the quotation mark and before the period.

    1) The 2003 Incentive Federation’s A Study Conducted Among Current Users of Merchandise and Travel Items . . . concluded that the largest numbers of non-sales incentive programs are targeted to operations employees.

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